Pulse: The Colorado Health Foundation Poll Announcement & 2020 Results

Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: Good morning to everyone Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: Just a couple of minutes, give a few other people a chance to join Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: Then we’ll be started Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: We will begin at about one minute everyone so Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: Welcome, as you’re joining Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: Good morning everyone Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: And welcome Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: Miller and I have the pleasure of being the president and CEO of the Colorado Health Foundation Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: I suspect many of you know a set the foundation already. But for those of you who don’t, Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: We are committed at the foundation to bringing health in reach to all Coloradans and particularly those for whom health seeing Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: furthest away from them. We take a broad view of health certainly to include the clinical setting and access to health, but we also think about the social and environmental conditions that that lead to good health or not good health Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: For example, we are focused on affordable housing and food access we care about the educational setting and educational setting is appropriate and welcoming and a healthy environment for children Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: And one of our key components of during our work is that we listen we listen and are informed by the communities that we exist to serve Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: And the broader community. And so it’s with that listening in money that I’m excited to introduce Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: The Colorado Health Foundation polling Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: And you might wonder why polling Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: Is another form of listening, we are trying to do both the art and the science of listening Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: The art of listening happens when we’re able to sit across the table from each other and and have a cup of coffee Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: The art happens when I get to visit and homeless encampment and talk to the folks who are experiencing homelessness, to find out what their lives are like and what they need to be healthy, but there’s there’s a science Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: And polling is the science of listening, it’s tested balanced it’s representative it’s equitable and it allows us to listen to people, both inside our normal sphere and soaks outside on the sphere

Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: So what you’re going to hear today is we’re going to share what we Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: Found out when we ask people about how things are going for them during coven and today you’re only going to hear some of the highlights. But we certainly plan to share it all Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: Our colleagues and my colleagues will let you know how you can dig in deeper and look at all the data we have absolutely nothing to hide. We have, we want to share it all with anyone who’s interested in looking Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: 2000 Coloradans is not an easy task to to get to, we have undertaken that we are excited about what we are learning. We want to use the information in order to help Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: shape our agenda, whether either confirms our strategic direction or whether it challenges us and asked us to think differently about our work and I know that is also for many of you, the over 200 of you that are here. You may either be policy Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: Part of the legislative body. You may be a direct service provider or could just been interested party Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: But we also hope that this information will be for you to confirm your current work or help you make make course corrections as you find out what’s on the minds of Colorado’s and what’s actually happening on the ground Karen McNeil-Miller, The Colorado Health Foundation: So again, I welcome you to this event. I’m excited about the data you’re going to hear and I’m going to turn it over to my colleague, Kyle Rojas leg lighter, who’s our Senior Director policy COM Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Thank you, Karen. And thank you all for joining us this morning to hear about the data that we got from the 2025 version of our annual Colorado pulse poll Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: As Karen mentioned our motivation for doing this really is an active listening, we wanted to ask Coloradans about a broad variety of topics that we’ve heard from them over the years Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Are really important for their health and well being. Things like whether or not they can get access to health care and how difficult that might be, whether they have a roof over their head, whether they’re able to put food on the table Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: In whether or not they have gainful employment Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So we asked about all of those things. And then we also took a careful look at 2020 in particular and thought about some of the important events in this year that are shaping our lives across Colorado and we added some specific questions Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: That are potentially unique to this year, about the coven pandemic. So you’ll see those in the data of what we heard from Coloradans across the state Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: In the information that will share with you today, I will note that listening to over 2000 Coloradans gives us the ability to do a lot with the data that we’re sharing with you today Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: One of the unique things about this poll is that we sampled all Coloradans Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Which means that we’re able to slice and dice and be specific about the data in a way that’s often not possible for pulling that you might see in our state’s Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Throughout the presentation today, you’ll see different examples of what’s possible with a pole and the data set. This largest we have from the 2020 version of the Colorado pulse poll Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: sprinkled throughout where we call out how Coloradans might have things in common and where specific subsets of Coloradans might be experiencing things differently in 2020 wer have different opinions Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: About things in 20 as well. So you’ll get a sampling of that in the presentation that we share with you today Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: But will also be making all of the data and everything that we learned from this all only available on a new website that we debuted this week Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: That has all of the information from this poll available to you to play around with to dig us deeply and as specifically as you would like to have in it. So at the end of this presentation will show you that website and all the stuff you can find on it Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: A few housekeeping notes for our time together. This morning we are recording this webinar. That means that we have muted all of the participants to ensure a high quality audio for the recording Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: But we do still want you to engage in this presentation. And for this to be a conversation Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So please do use the chat function and zoom to send in your comments, your questions, the things that you’re wondering about or that strikes you and the data Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Because we’ll have a Q AMP a period at the end of our time together today and get to as many of those questions as we receive via chat as possible Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: I’m proud to introduce you. Now the bipartisan polling team of Dave Mets and Lori Weigel, who are our partners and conducting this poll Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: They’ll walk you through the results of what we heard how we did this listening and lift up some of the highlights to get this conversation going today

Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So again, thank you for joining us. We very much appreciate your interest in this poll and the information that we have to share with you and I’ll turn it over to Dave and Lori to walk us through the data Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Right. Well, thank you very much. Karen and Kyle. I’m Dave met some a partner with FM three research, one of the two firms that conducted the pulse survey Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And we’re going to walk through with you today a series of highlights from the pole Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Is Kyle mentioned there’s a lot more data and a lot of richness underneath the overall numbers will be sharing this morning. And at the end of the presentation, we’ll hear more about how you can dig through that data and learn more yourself Dave Metz – FM3 Research: To start with, we wanted to provide a little bit of an overview about the methodology of the poll the results we’re sharing today come from 2275 interviews we conducted with adult Colorado residents from around the state Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Our sample was drawn from the US Postal Service Delivery sequence file, it was essentially a random sample of residential addresses across Colorado Dave Metz – FM3 Research: The interviewing took place throughout most of the month of August, and we conducted interviews both online and by telephone on landline and wireless phones Dave Metz – FM3 Research: We drove people to the online interviews through emailed invitations through text messages and through postcards sent to residential addresses, where we didn’t have other means of contacting the respondents Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and in order to make sure we could speak with a little more precision to the views of Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Some subsets of Colorado’s population that make up smaller shares of the of the state, but may have distinct opinions on a number of the issues we asked about Dave Metz – FM3 Research: We over sampled both Black and Asian American and Pacific Islander Coloradans and that data is highlighted at a number of points in the results will go through today Dave Metz – FM3 Research: The overall results have a margin of error of 2.83% plus or minus. There’s a number of places where we call out subgroups within the data. And obviously, they are the margins of error will be a little bit higher Dave Metz – FM3 Research: We should also highlight the region. The reason why you have to pollsters talking to you today. My firm FM three research when we conduct research in partisan races works only for democrats Dave Metz – FM3 Research: I’m joined. However, by my colleague, Lori Weigel will introduce herself in a moment. She is a principal with new bridge strategy and her firm when they pull in partisan races only pulls for republicans Dave Metz – FM3 Research: The two of us came together as a bipartisan team to ensure that perspectives from both sides of the aisle were reflected in both the way the questions were designed Dave Metz – FM3 Research: The way the survey methodology was structured and the way the results were analyzed. I’m also joined by my colleague Gucci Adele puco who was also part of the research team Dave Metz – FM3 Research: So with that background. Let’s go ahead and dive into what we learned and I’ll hand it over to Lori now to introduce herself and talk Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Some of the initial questions Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Thanks, Dave. So we’re going to look at. I’m Lori Weigel, I’m the principal and Newbridge strategy. I’m here in Colorado and happen for over 20 years. In fact, I spent a little bit of time this morning, looking back Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Through some data because we really are going to see despite our annoyance with the overuse of the term unprecedented to describe our times today, some of the data we’re going to be showing you is really unprecedented. And I’ll start with Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Just one of the simplest and brought us questions that we as pollsters ever asked Coloradans IS TO TELL US WHAT THE MOST IMPORTANT ISSUE FACING THE STATE IS RIGHT NOW Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So first of all, this is just a volunteered response they could literally say anything Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But the fact that we have sort of two issues that have never before I had my experience top the list of voters concerns in the state Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Is really striking. Obviously, one is brand new. And that’s the pandemic and I will show you some examples in just a second of some of the responses people gave about that. But the second not far behind actually is a focus on government politics how things are working divisiveness Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And that, again, I went back through some work. I’d done for the Rocky Mountain News over the Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: In the early 2000s. I can’t find a case in which this was one of the themes that emerged from this question Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And not shockingly as well. Given that we were interviewing in August issues related to wildfires to climate change to some of the environmental concerns in our state were also significant Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And then 13% also focused on issues related to the economy and jobs which has changed dramatically. But keep this list in mind because even though this may not have been the most volunteered response Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Some of these themes continue to emerge. And we’ll see in just one second, how Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: How, even though education only registered at 4%. There’s a lot of a lot of angst over schooling and how we’re handling a lot of these different issues from public safety and social justice

Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Even if they didn’t register at the top of the list. Just to give you a flavor for what we heard from respondents. On the next slide, you can see Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: There really is some some richness to a lot of their concerns and for many people, whether it was coven 19 or what have you. There were many aspects of those issues Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: That emerged from a single response. So it could be the economic outcomes from climate change or could be health and safety from Kobe 19 Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So a real sort of richness from what people were telling us, so not to overlooked anything on the next slide, we can see that we ran through a number of different issues and asked respondents to tell us Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: how serious a problem. They thought that was facing our state was an extremely serious very serious somewhat serious or not too serious problem in Colorado Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So you can see the degrees by which people responded, of course, these were all randomized we’ve shown them in sort of the rank order here Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Particularly by those who said it was an extremely or very serious problem. And there’s a few things to note here, despite the fact that the pandemic has had such broad ripple effects Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: We can see that some of the issues that we were talking about prior to march Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Or. So once that emerged as top to your concerns. So certainly, the harm to the economy caused by the coronavirus three quarters viewing that as at least a very serious problem. But things like the cost of housing homelessness cost of living Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Also around more than three and five telling us that those are extremely or very serious problems. So we’ve sorted added a new layer of concerns Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: On top of someone’s that were definitely evident before we’re going to talk about mental health and a little bit that a majority, also named that as an extremely are very serious problem Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Now remember harm to the economy caused by the coronavirus was at the very top of those list of concerns Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: It’s 74% but on the next slide, you can see that when we, when we specifically called out illness and deaths caused by coronavirus only 43% I categorize that as an extremely or very serious problem, although certainly far more said it was at least somewhat serious Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So that, that’s sort of the significant distinction, and we’ll talk about a little bit of that Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: In one moment, but also things that have been in the news lately like police violence and misconduct. We had about two and five calling that out Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: As an extremely are very serious problem hunger was in that sort of same level in terms of those response. So on the following slide Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: We wanted to point sort of dig underneath these numbers a little bit. One thing that was very clear in the number of questions, not just this battery of questions as well Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Was that black Coloradans were expressing sort of heightened concern about several of these issues, some that were somewhat lower tier for coloreds overall were Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: viewed by the vast majority of black Coloradans is extremely are very serious problems. For example, police violence and misconduct. But that’s not the only one hunger as well was significantly Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: More likely to be expressed as an extremely are very serious problem among black Coloradans than among Coloradans overall. So a number of distinctions in that data Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: By race and ethnicity. And on the next page. Another thing that we can see is that lower income households in the state. And of course, we had to use broad categories here Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: To be able to look at significant numbers of Coloradans but overall lower income households are more likely to express concern about a number of different issues Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Homelessness significantly higher on that aspect, but also cost of living jobs in the economy. I mean, just Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: issue after issue were ones that lower income Coloradans were more likely to rate a serious concerns the notably the harm to the economy caused by the coronavirus was one that was widely shared across all income categories Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Although we’ll see in some of our later data that specifically that the bear the brunt of the economy economic impacts are being formed by those lower income Coloradans Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And then, of course, as we all know how party can play a major impact and how Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Coloradans are viewing the world. And that’s the case here as well. There’s a number of issues where there is sort of a partisan dynamic

Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But again, what’s striking is that on the harm to the economy caused by the coronavirus that’s widely shared across the partisan spectrum Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But, notably the one we’ve highlighted here illness and death caused by coronavirus is far more apt to be seen as an extremely are very serious problem among Democrats Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Than it is among Republicans, but it’s not the only issue that has a partisan context to it. Other issues like climate change and number of others also had for relationship to party Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So, Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: I’ll pass it back to Dave So talk about some more fun data Dave Metz – FM3 Research: All right. Thank you Lori. So we also had a series of questions that dealt with the way Coloradans view their own health and not just the issue of healthcare broadly in terms of access or cost, but how they felt about their physical and mental health Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And we asked them to do a self evaluation on a five point scale rating their own physical health and mental health is either. Excellent, very good. Good only fair report Dave Metz – FM3 Research: So this data is, of course, subject to all of the whims of human nature, our ability to understand, you know, our own Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Strengths and Weaknesses when it comes to our health, sometimes is limited Dave Metz – FM3 Research: But generally speaking, Coloradans believe that they’re in pretty good physical health majority rate their health is either excellent or very good, although it has fewer than one in five that call it excellent reflecting at least Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Some degree of concern among most portions of the population. Only about one in 10 13% are reading their physical health as fair, or poor Dave Metz – FM3 Research: There are some notable demographic distinctions. However, in the way that Coloradans answer this question, as you’ll see here Dave Metz – FM3 Research: The most striking ones are along lines of income, there is a clear correlation between household income and Coloradans likelihood to indicate that their health is either fair, or poor Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And in particular, those in the lowest income group that is Lori just described, have higher concern about a wide range of issues facing the state Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Are also more likely to rate their own health as only fair, or poor, more than one quarter of them 27% put their health in that category Dave Metz – FM3 Research: You’ll also see slightly elevated numbers of both Black and Asian Pacific Islander Coloradans indicate that their health is fair, or poor Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Although I should note in each case, it is still a minority of respondents cross demographic subgroups within the state. Most people believe that they are in pretty good physical health Dave Metz – FM3 Research: When we asked about mental health. Most people also classify themselves as either being excellent or very good. In fact, the proportion who think they are an excellent mental health is almost a third of all Coloradans at 64% total either excellent or very good Dave Metz – FM3 Research: This issue though is subject to the same kinds of demographic differences within the population in particular the socio economic distinctions Dave Metz – FM3 Research: The more affluent your household is, the more likely you are to rate your mental health positively Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Whereas, those with the lowest level of household income under $30,000 per year are notably more likely to say that their mental health is only fair, or poor Dave Metz – FM3 Research: This issue is one that we explored in a fair amount of additional detail in the survey Lori noted, we have a majority of Coloradans who believe that mental health broadly Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Is a very serious problem for the state. And as we’ll see shortly there, it’s very clear that the pandemic. It’s related impacts on the economy and the isolating effects of people needing to stay at home. I’ve also had a significant toll on most Coloradans mental health Dave Metz – FM3 Research: In terms of getting care for mental health Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Issues, or substance use issues. We wanted to understand if Coloradans either themselves or a member of their family had sought help and care for either of these issues and been unable to obtain it Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Understanding of course there’s a natural tendency in circles like this to potentially understate the degree to which you are a family member might have faced these kinds of challenges Dave Metz – FM3 Research: We still have one in five Coloradans that tell us they have had someone in their household who needed mental health services and we’re unable to access them Dave Metz – FM3 Research: One in 10 say the same for substance use services Dave Metz – FM3 Research: For those populations that told us that they had sought care but been unable to obtain it. We wanted to understand more about why Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And so we asked them to tell us in their own words what factors had kept themselves or a family member from getting access to those services Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And overwhelmingly it was financial considerations that seemed to pose the biggest barrier for these Coloradans

Dave Metz – FM3 Research: About a third of this group said just straight out, it was the cost or the expense. Another 19% Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Said that insurance wouldn’t cover the cost of treatment, which obviously reflects another financial barrier Dave Metz – FM3 Research: But a quarter of them talked about logistical factors that either they didn’t know where to go Dave Metz – FM3 Research: They had identified a place to find care, but it was too far away, or that they would have to wait too long to get care in that location Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And then there were just some sort of internal factors that were an obstacle to care for others about 14% that they feared being judged or feared the stigma of acknowledging that they had a mental health or substance use disorder Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Challenge and about one in 10 said that in speaking about a family member, they wanted the family member to get care, but the family member declined to do so Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And again, because this was an open ended question where the participants could answer the question in their own words. We thought it might be helpful to just Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Show you some of the comments that Coloradans offered in response to this question to give you a flavor of Dave Metz – FM3 Research: What it was they said had kept them from getting either mental health care or substance use care when they needed it, these dynamics, by the way, are not in any way unique to Colorado asking similar questions and other states. We’ve seen Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Similar descriptions of the factors that have posed challenges for people in getting the care that they need Dave Metz – FM3 Research: So with that, I’ll hand it back to Lori is as we discussed a moment ago, the economic challenges of the virus are rated by Coloradans HIS BIGGEST ISSUE FACING THE STATE writ large. And we also ask them questions to understand how it affected them at the individual level Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Thanks, Dave. So we asked Coloradans a question that actually Colorado Health Foundation and asked a couple of years ago asking people, whether they were better off or worse off financially than a year ago Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Or is their financial situation about the same. Now, this may seem surprising, given that so many are concerned about the broad economic impacts from the pandemic Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But for the most part coloreds are fairly split about a quarter telling us that things are actually better for their family than a year ago Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: The same proportion telling us that things are worse and about half saying about the same. That said, Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: In previous polling. It was a little bit different in that we had about half telling us that things were better than they had been a year ago. So some of that optimism has dropped out of this question Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: We’ve gotten a number of questions asking us, why this might be the case. And certainly that’s all theoretical Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But certainly, there could be distinctions based on who’s able to work from home and then who is able to who might have own homes and therefore feel a little more from rising home values as well as the stock market, which has certainly rebounded Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And had hit a record high during the time that we were interviewing response Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But for those who are worse off. I don’t think it’ll be a shock to anyone here that there’s a dramatic distinction based on household income for the most part Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: You can see that those in the highest income category categories are twice as likely to say that they are better off than a year ago than worse off. And we have a dramatically different picture. Among those in the lowest income categories were Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Two and five are telling us that their financial situation is worse off than a year ago only 16% better off and then sort of the division among everyone else Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So real distinction there based on household income and we’ve got all of this data. In fact, all this data is split out by a number of different dynamics and is available on the Colorado pulse website. So there’s lots more to dig into. I know some people are already asking about that Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But we also wanted to not just look back, but look prospectively about a number of different concerns and worries that people might be having one being Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: As we’ve seen in the news a lot of worry that they may lose their home because they can’t afford the monthly rent or mortgage and in fact we had one in more than one in five coloreds tell us that that was a concern that they shared Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: There are some distinctions here again income plane and major role in terms of being more concerned that they can afford Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: The rent or mortgage might lose their home. It’s half of those in the lowest income households one in three among those just one step up on the income ladder and it’s only slightly more likely to be those in urban areas. So Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Despite the soaring home values and rents in the Denver Metro area and along the front range

Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: This is a widely shared across all types of communities in our state. Another concern we asked them about was being without health insurance coverage over the next year Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And that was even higher 27% said that they shared that concern in fact 12% were very concerned about that and that again was probably held in all types of community, but was more likely to be evident Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Among those and somewhat lower income households that was sort of the defining difference there. And finally, we also saw that one in five are worried about being able to afford to feed their family in the coming year Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Well, it was only 6% that said they were very worried we had another 14% expressing at least some concern about that Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And again, income really was the great divide there although on I’d be remiss not to note that black Coloradans are more likely to share this concern, as well as the concern about being able to afford the rent Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Or mortgage, as we talked about earlier. So if we look at that all holistically and sort of pull that together on the next slide Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: You can see that we’ve got 38% of Coloradans but looking ahead, over the next year Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: They are either concerned, they’re going to be unable to afford their rent or mortgage so that they might go without health insurance coverage Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Or the very basic need of being able to afford food for their family again, that is, the vast majority of those in those lowest income households not shockingly, it’s more likely to be shared among the unemployed or those who are already without health insurance Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And it’s more likely to be able to do them on color and sub color throughout the state. So, Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: You know, we’re seeing some real differences in the impacts of this very different economy and the outcomes of the pandemic in terms of concerns for the future among especially lower income Coloradans Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Speaking of which, I’ll let Dave talk a little bit about some of what we dug into on racial equity issues Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Thank you Lori Dave Metz – FM3 Research: So we have a number of questions that we wanted to ask to understand the degree to which Coloradans perceive that Dave Metz – FM3 Research: People who live in the state and come from different racial and ethnic backgrounds are impacted differently by a number of the issues we’ve talked about so far Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Their interactions with police the impacts of the economic downturn and their ability to afford health care Dave Metz – FM3 Research: So we asked the respondents to indicate whether compared to white Coloradans black Coloradans are more likely or less likely to experience a variety of impacts and as you’ll see, for color whole Dave Metz – FM3 Research: NIF equity state that this act of 58% of all Coloradans say that they think black Coloradans are more likely to be treated unfairly by the police Dave Metz – FM3 Research: A 52% majority think they’re more likely to experience negative impacts from an economic downturn and a 49% plurality believe that they are more likely to receive inadequate or poor quality healthcare Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Those perceptions cut across all racial and ethnic groups within the Colorado population. They are more prevalent among black Coloradans they are much more likely to think that Dave Metz – FM3 Research: People who share their ethnic background are more likely to experience these negative incomes, or negative impacts Dave Metz – FM3 Research: But as you’ll see, among white Coloradans Asian and Pacific Islander Coloradans Hispanic and Latinx Coloradans and among all Coloradans of color Dave Metz – FM3 Research: In most cases we have majorities who say yes black Coloradans are disproportionately likely to experience these impact Dave Metz – FM3 Research: I should also note, by the way, on these slides where we’re dealing with issues relating to race and ethnicity Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Our interviews encompassed Coloradans of all racial and ethnic backgrounds, including Native American indigenous Coloradans Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Unfortunately, the subsample for that group was too small to break out for reliable analysis, but it is included. When we look at all Coloradans of color, as you’ll see on the right hand side of this slide, for example Dave Metz – FM3 Research: We also asked the same question about Hispanic Coloradans again compared to white residents of the state. Are they more likely or less likely to experience Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Different outcomes when it comes to an economic downturn treatment by police and the health care they receive Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And once again we have majorities or plurality of Coloradans who said yes Hispanic residents of the state are more likely to experience. Each of these negative outcomes than our white Coloradans Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And similarly, that perception of the differential impact on Hispanic and Latin next residents of the state was held across racial and ethnic subgroups

Dave Metz – FM3 Research: White Coloradans black Coloradans Asian Pacific Islander Coloradans and Spanish Coloradans all agreed that the Hispanic population is disproportionately impacted in each of these areas Dave Metz – FM3 Research: We asked the same set of questions also about Asian American Coloradans here. We saw a somewhat different response Dave Metz – FM3 Research: In this case majority’s believes that Asian American Coloradans are not likely to face different impacts than white Coloradans do in each of these three areas Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Among those who did see a different impact. They were more likely to say that Asian American Coloradans would be negatively impacted as opposed to Dave Metz – FM3 Research: More positively impacted, but the prevailing sentiment was that ultimately the their experience would not be significantly different from white Coloradans Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And as you’ll see when we look at the subgroup of Asian and Pacific Islander respondents. They were somewhat more likely than others to perceive that their community would be negatively impacted in each of these areas Dave Metz – FM3 Research: But not to the same degree that black Coloradans said about their community, nor Hispanic and Latinx Coloradans about there’s Dave Metz – FM3 Research: One area that we wanted to have a special focus on was interactions with the police, given the events of the past year Dave Metz – FM3 Research: The killing of George Floyd, and obviously the protests that have taken place across Colorado and across the country. We wanted to understand Coloradans interactions with the police and their experiences with them Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And so we asked our respondents whether they had in the ever experienced a in the last year, a negative experience with police or if they had ever felt afraid of the police, whether or not they interacting directly with them Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And in each case just under one in five Coloradans reported that they had had a negative Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Experience, or that they had felt afraid of police. So for the vast majority of Coloradans they’re saying, No, I haven’t had a negative interaction and haven’t felt afraid Dave Metz – FM3 Research: But there are significant minorities who have had those experiences Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And as you’ll see here there were some significant differences among subgroups of Coloradans in the degree to which they reported either these feelings of fear or these negative interactions Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Some of the more dramatic differences came for that second question. Have you ever felt afraid of police Dave Metz – FM3 Research: On a note for example for black Coloradans 42% of them more than two and five indicated that they had felt afraid of police sometime in the past year Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Significantly more than we see for any other racial or ethnic subgroup of the state’s residents. There were also some pretty dramatic distinctions by age Dave Metz – FM3 Research: The younger you are, the more likely you are to report having had a negative interaction with police or having felt afraid of them, and particularly it’s those residents under age 30 Dave Metz – FM3 Research: About a third of whom indicate that they’ve had a negative experience for that they have felt afraid of the police Dave Metz – FM3 Research: It is also the case that those who speak a language other than English at home, those who were born outside of the United States are more likely to report fear of the police Dave Metz – FM3 Research: There’s an income correlation as well with lower income households, more likely to report both negative experiences and feelings of fear Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And then another item that stood out was Coloradans who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning Dave Metz – FM3 Research: were extremely highly likely to indicate that they had felt afraid of police almost half of them 49% indicated that they had those feelings of fear. Over the course of the last 12 months Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Now as Kyle said at the outset, given the the context of this year’s poll obviously coronavirus is shaping Coloradans experiences and in a wide variety of different ways. And so we wanted to have a more detailed series of questions that Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Explored what they have experienced and what they think the public policy reactions to the pandemic should be I’ll hand it back to Lori now to talk a little bit about what Coloradans have experienced Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Yeah, so in such a unique time. It was really Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Incredible to be able to ask, just how it’s affecting everyone else. I know all of us have sort of talked within our own little bubbles of people about Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: What we’re going through and what we’re experiencing, but having this rich data is really sort of a community asset Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: I feel like. So thanks for the Colorado Health Foundation, being able to dig into so many aspects of the pandemic here, one that really stood out Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And that has gotten some of the press coverage. So some of you may have seen is the fact that a majority of Coloradans are telling us that they’ve experienced increase mental health strain, such as anxiety loneliness or stress as a result of the pandemic

Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And we’ll talk about who that is in just a minute. But it’s one of the most widely shared Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Experiences in all the data Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: There’s a number of differences here as well. We had almost a third of Coloradans telling us, they’ve had their work hours cut back or we just reduced, but at the same time, we had more than two and five. Tell us, they’ve been able to work from home Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Through some of this. Some of this very different time at the same time there’s been one in five that said they’ve been required to go to work, even though they had health and safety concerns and then as we mentioned before, people are experiencing some really Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Some real financial difficulties and having been laid off 13% so they’ve already experienced that Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: been unable to pay for bed basic necessities like food was nearly one in five Coloradans and then had trouble caring for aging or disabled family members about 12% Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Responded and kind of on that as well. So looking at some of those impacts well mental health strain certainly cut across most income categories, a number of others were disproportionately Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: being reported by those in the lowest income categories, particularly being laid off 29% of those in the lowest income categories from Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: reported having been laid off during the pandemic, almost half of them said they’d have work hours cut back or we just reduced that’s more than double that in the highest income categories and then Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: As well. They were more likely to report being unable to pay for basic necessities like food three times that of those in the higher income categories Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But some shared experiences as well in terms of having trouble caring for aging or disabled family members, for example, or just being mentioned the mental health string really cutting across income categories Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: You can also see on the next slide, that there were some differences based on age and based on gender. Our youngest respondents those under the age of 50 were far more apt to tell us aid experienced increase mental health strain Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: They were more likely as well to the hips indicate that they’d had hours work hours cut back or wages reduced and then also had more likely to have been laid off to women were more likely than men to indicate that experience of increased mental health strain to Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So as some significant difference by gender on that variable Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: We also saw that across racial and ethnic lines that mental health strain was evident really Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: No matter once background that for all people of color 47% indicated experiencing that increased mental health strain is 54% of my Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: White responded. So really, again, just sort of a shared experience in terms of that difficulty, despite the fact that some respondents of color were more likely to indicate some other of the impact, such as work hours being cut Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So we did ask to about their experience in the workplace. So among those who are currently employed, we asked them if their employer was doing too much the right amount or too little to protect employees from Calvin Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: We did not define that for them. So that was sort of their subjective view of what doing too much the right amount or too little would be Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But the vast majority three quarters were telling us it was about the right amount Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And then a real split one and 10 saying too much and about the same proportion same too little. So really sort of hitting a sweet spot in that position. And then finally, we asked Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: We asked respondents to tell us about childcare responsibilities they obviously are not living in my house. I found it a little more difficult to handle. Turn the coronavirus pandemic Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: We had a majority same in been pretty easy. A parents of children under the age of 18 telling us that have been relatively easy Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But two and five telling us that have been more difficult. And you can see that, especially those are somewhat younger Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And those in sort of middle to lower income categories, more likely to tell us that they experienced some difficulty handling those childcare responsibilities during this unusual time Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So, and then finally we asked them, would they be able to quarantine or self isolate at home for the necessary 14 days

Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: If they had to the vast majority of Colorado said yep I could do it. Although about one in five told us it was post some serious challenges, three quarters said felt pretty comfortable indicating that they could do it Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: It was only 6% who said they felt like they could not be able to meet that full 14 days or or at all Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And those who are more likely to report quarantine could pose some serious challenges they were more likely to be younger and renters and again income played into this in terms of being more likely to pose a serious challenge Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So with that, I will think I’m passing it back to Dave. On the next slide to talk about some policy responses I given the many challenges that Colorado are facing Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Thank you Lori. So the data we have looked at so far I’ve shown some pretty broad consensus among Coloradans on a lot of issues relating to the pandemic agreement that the economic impacts have been severe and Dave Metz – FM3 Research: A lot of commonalities in terms of how they think the pandemic has impacted them on issues like the the mental health impact Dave Metz – FM3 Research: There are some significant differences, though in the way they Coloradans believe the state should react to the pandemic Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And one of the most fundamental questions we asked which mirrors. A question that we’ve asked in a variety of other states and in national surveys gave respondents a choice between two potential approaches to the pandemic Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Asking them, whether it was more important to save as many lives as possible by delaying fully reopening Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Even if it hurts the economy and leads to job losses or saying it’s more important to fully reopen the economy and get people back to work, even if it means that it takes longer to fight the pandemic and more lives are lost Dave Metz – FM3 Research: a plurality of Coloradans said they would prioritize saving lives even it’s in cost to the economy at 50% but almost two and five said that we should prioritize reopening the economy, even if there are some health risks associated with doing so Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Not surprisingly, there are some pretty big differences among subgroups within Colorado’s population in their views of this issue and the biggest one of course is partisan and we’ve heard a lot about the different political perspectives on the issue of reopening the economy Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Democrats are overwhelming and their belief that we should focus on saving lives and delay a full reopening at two to 10 they hold that view Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Independence also hold that view, but only by a plurality of 48 to 39 so they are more closely divided on the question, whereas republicans and almost equally overwhelming numbers believe that reopening the economy should be the priority right now by a margin of 73 to 16 Dave Metz – FM3 Research: When we look at it by ethnicity, you will see that communities of color in Colorado by roughly a two to one margin say that we should prioritize saving lives, whereas white Coloradans are more closely divided 47 to 41 a plurality holds that same view Dave Metz – FM3 Research: See, there’s a correlation here in ethnicity Coloradans of color are much more likely to identify as democrats most Colorado republicans are white. And so there’s an overlap between these two perspectives Dave Metz – FM3 Research: There’s also some differences by age with younger Coloradans those under age 50 a majority of them saying they thought we should delay reopening in order to save lives Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Whereas their older counterparts are about evenly divided on this question. There’s also a noteworthy urban, rural split with Coloradans who say that they live in a city Dave Metz – FM3 Research: By a two to one margin saying we should delay reopening in order to protect public health those in suburbs holding the same view that by slightly narrower margin Dave Metz – FM3 Research: While small town and rural Coloradans are much more likely to say that they think that we should reopen as soon as possible Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Those these patterns that you’ll see here within Colorado are very consistent with what the national polling shows both in terms of the overall preferences and the way it breaks out among these demographic subgroups Dave Metz – FM3 Research: There’s also a distinction by gender. Men are about evenly split women by a margin of almost, but not quite two to one say that public health should be the priority, and we should hold off on reopening the economy Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And one very interesting correlation here. When you look at views by income, the lowest income Colorado households who, as we’ve seen in the prior data that Lori described Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Are those most impacted economically by the pandemic so far, or nonetheless also those most likely to say that we should delay reopening the economy Dave Metz – FM3 Research: In order to save as many lives as possible. They hold that view by a margin of 16 to 25 essentially a 35 point difference

Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Which generally declines as we move up the income scale and a much narrower 51 to 41 majority of those with household incomes in the six figure range indicate that they prefer saving as many lives as possible by delaying reopening the economy Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Now you know that may seem a little bit counterintuitive. Those who are feeling the most economic burden are also among those most hesitant to embrace fully reopening the economy Dave Metz – FM3 Research: There’s a number of factors that may play in here obviously lower income Coloradans as we’ve noted are among those most vulnerable, not just to the economic impact of the pandemic, but also to its public health impacts Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Particularly Coloradans of color who are disproportionately in that lower income category Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Also, it’s possible that a number of people in that lower income group are also among those who are say that they have been required to work Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Despite some public health concerns they may be in jobs where they’re still in the workplace and so for them, the economic benefit of a fuller reopening may not prove to them, whereas the public health risks that Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Go along with it. Maybe things that they’re concerned about. We can’t. We don’t know for sure, unfortunately didn’t have a series of questions to follow up and explain their thinking. But that income dynamic, I think is an interesting one to note Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Now we see an even more stark division. When we asked about what should be done with Colorado schools and we asked the respondents to indicate which concern them more out of two competing sets of risks Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Are they more concerned that children will go back to in person classroom instruction to soon it’ll be exposed to health risks as a result Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Or are they more concerned that children will be kept in remote online learning too long Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And will miss both opportunities for education and for social and emotional development that would come from more direct interaction with their peers and Coloradans are basically split right down the middle, on which of these aspects concerns them more Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Once again, we see a partisan dynamic that seems to be the starkest division on this question democrats overwhelmingly expressing more concerned about too quick of a return to in person instruction while Republicans. Conversely, by a margin of 321 or more concerned about pro long Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Online learning Dave Metz – FM3 Research: ethnic divisions on this question are relatively modest we see pretty close divisions among most Racial and Ethnic subgroups of Colorado’s population Dave Metz – FM3 Research: But of course, you know, one of the most interesting subsets to look at here are those who actually are parents of school aged children Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And as you’ll see, among that subgroup. Those who have children in the Qaeda to 12 age range Dave Metz – FM3 Research: 54% of them say that their biggest concern is the children will be kept in online remote learning too long Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And obviously, for many of them. That’s what they’ve been experiencing over the course of the last half year or so Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Although that is not. It is a majority sentiment, but it is not an overwhelming one, there are still more than a third of parents and school aged children who are concerned about to click of a return to in person instruction Dave Metz – FM3 Research: In terms of some policy responses we ask people how they would feel about a variety of different actions that could be taken to address what the pandemic is doing in Colorado Dave Metz – FM3 Research: We asked them whether they would support or oppose providing free code 19 testing medical treatment or making a vaccine available for free. When it becomes available Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And at least four and five Coloradans indicated that they supported each of those concepts. Now, we should note we didn’t ask a detailed policy proposal here. That said, how Dave Metz – FM3 Research: These services would be paid for how they would be distributed. But the notion that this is something that should be provided to Coloradans Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Free of charge is something that the public embraces and embraces fairly strongly. If you look at the dark blue bars on the left, that’s the proportion that said they would not just support but strongly support each of these ideas Dave Metz – FM3 Research: We also asked about a mask mandate for places of business and found that 72% of Coloradans overall said they support having requirements to wear a mask in those kinds of places of businesses with almost three and five indicating strong support for that idea Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And to an impressive degree support for these policies actually cuts across partisan lines as we’ve talked about on our range of questions here. There are some deep partisan divisions Dave Metz – FM3 Research: This is not one of those questions. We basically have upwards of almost unanimous opinion among Democrats that they like all of these ideas Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And then solid majority support among independence as well Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And even among Republicans. While there is more ambivalence about the mask mandate, with only 53% in favor, it is still the majority of Republicans that act that idea and more than two thirds of Colorado Republican support making free testing medical treatment and vaccines available Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Now, to say that the vaccines should be made available at no cost is one perspective. But there’s a more important question, which is how likely are Coloradans to take a vaccine. Once it becomes available. And here we saw

Dave Metz – FM3 Research: While there was a solid majority of Coloradans who said they would be likely to get vaccinated, there is a significant subgroup almost a third of those polled who said they would be unlikely to do so Dave Metz – FM3 Research: These numbers also correspond pretty closely to what national polling has shown in the same question is asked, Dave Metz – FM3 Research: The group that it has reservations about vaccination. There’s a few demographic characteristics that seemed to make them distinct Dave Metz – FM3 Research: One of them is ideology while more liberal and moderate Coloradans sizable majorities indicate that they would be likely to get vaccinated Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Coloradans who identify as conservative are evenly divided on the question with roughly half saying, they’d be likely to get vaccinated and the other half saying though Dave Metz – FM3 Research: There’s an age gap as well. Colorado seniors are significantly more likely to embrace the vaccine, with more than three quarters of them, indicating that they’d be likely to get vaccinated, obviously Dave Metz – FM3 Research: People in that age group for both are more at risk and also may over the course of their lives have had more experience with seeing the role that vaccines can can play in their public health benefits Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And there’s also a difference by educational attainment Coloradans with a high school degree I express a greater concern about getting vaccinated than those with higher levels of education Dave Metz – FM3 Research: So finally, we had a series of questions about priorities for state government and state funding when it comes to Coloradans health and I’ll hand it back to Lori to talk about those Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Great. Thanks, Dave. Last section, everybody. Thanks for sticking with us. So lots of data here. Um, we asked respondents about a number of different areas where state government might allocate additional funds Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: In an effort to improve the health of all Coloradans that additional funds and state government, being in there may play a role, and some of the data that we’re going to see slip by party Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But for overall we saw Colorado widely sharing the view that it was extremely are very important for the state to allocate additional funds to ensure that no Colorado goes hungry Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And to ensure that people have places to buy fresh, healthy food foreign five Coloradans rated both of those is extremely or very important Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Along the lines of what day was talking about when we asked about providing discounted or free access to the coven 19 vaccine when it’s available. We had three quarters responding positively to that Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And then, ensuring all Coloradans have access to healthcare as well. That alone can be its own survey, of course. So the devils, usually in the details and how that might be implemented, but in concept Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: The vast majority of voters are telling us that that is something we’re state government ought to be involved Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: On the next slide, we get into a range of issues that about two thirds or fewer but still majorities are telling us are extremely are very important when it comes to mental health Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: When it comes to having access to safe, stable affordable housing helping the homeless and then Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Ensuring communities have places for exercise and recreation. Probably the most division and providing preschool for children under age five Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But when you include those who say it’s at least somewhat important. It is again the vast majority of Coloradans that are viewing that as a as a worthy goal Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Again, there are some divisions in terms of how some of these are perceived and I mentioned state government allocating additional funds I whenever we evoke those words we will often get Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: A more partisan response. And you can see that I’m virtually all of these. We had three quarters or greater have democrats Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Telling us that these each one of these was extremely are very important Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Republicans were somewhat weaker. But again, many of these were ones that they share those concerns and most are ones where we have half or greater Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Telling us that was extremely are very important for state government Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: To be spending resources in those particular areas. Once I really stood out where, again, the employment is one where it’s really shared across party lines Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So helping those Coloradans who aren’t working to find employment but also on food as well and having places to buy fresh, healthy food for all Coloradans was significantly higher among Republicans Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: As well. There were some distinctions on the next slide Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Well, less less sort of distinctions greater degrees, which many were sharing these these worthy goals

Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But we saw for the most part, that coloreds of all racial and ethnic backgrounds rank their priorities. Similarly, Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: I will note there were a few that really stood out, particularly among black Coloradans preschool was one that black and Hispanic Coloradans were more apt to say was something that was important Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But again, these are all ones where we saw near majorities telling us that all these for extremely are very important goals for the state government to allocate additional funds Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And then on the next slide. And again, some of these may be issues that especially in work, Dave. And I’ve done Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: On homelessness. We’ve usually seen people’s perceptions of homelessness center around urban areas. So it was really striking to me that when we asked about Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Whether there was access to safe, stable affordable housing sort of in the middle of this page here or helping people who are experiencing homelessness Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: That we had majorities, even in rural areas, saying that that was something where state government ought to be allocating Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Additional funds. So while there were some distinctions based on type of community. And I’ll just note that type of Community usually played a greater role, then specifically were in the stage, you are Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: That this was that these are sort of shared goals for the state government to to put some behind in terms of some resources Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: And then on the next slide. That’s it Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: I repeat myself too. So I wanted to pass it back to Kyle, because we’re going to be available to answer some of the questions that I haven’t been able to answer, while Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Looking at the chat box Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Great. Thank you Lori and Dave Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: For walking us through a very rich set of information. Thanks, all of you for staying with us as we walk through that, please join me and taking a deep breath Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: You just absorbed a lot of the listening that we’ve been absorbing and sorting through here. But now we want to have a conversation with you Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: What struck you as interesting in the data. What do you have further questions about as well because certainly Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: One of the experiences that we often have a car Health Foundation, when we engage in listening, like this is that, you know, as many questions as we ask an Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: interesting and fascinating and as informative as the information is that we hear back from Coloradans when we do a poll like this Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: It. Oftentimes, this raises even more questions. So the conversation doesn’t stop here, it really begins here and as a way for us to to think through what needs to be asking from this point. So we’ll Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Turn to some of the questions that you all have been submitting via the chat box, as we’ve been going through the data already Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: But you have opportunities still to put in your questions. If you’ve been listening and absorbing but don’t be shy about the chat box and we’ll get to as many of those as we are able to before we wrap up at 1130 today Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So Dave and Lori I’ll kick off this conversation with a question about Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: What we heard about the Coloradans who are unable to access Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Health Care Services specifically for mental health or substance abuse and those who are saying that they wanted to get those kinds of services and weren’t able to do so Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Anyone’s we answered in that way. We followed up with an open ended question. So we didn’t guide their response about what was making it difficult to get those kinds of services or what barriers Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: They encountered when they attempted to get mental health or substance abuse care in our state Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Can you talk a little bit about what you heard in those open ended responses and whether or not. Stigma fear of judgment and some of those things might have shown up differently depending on the race and ethnicity of folks who are responding and those open ended questions Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Yeah. So unfortunately, as you recall, we only had about one in five Coloradans who reported that they had sought Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Those kinds of services and been unable to obtain them Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And within that sub sample, we don’t have enough respondents of different races and ethnicities to analyze the variation in their open ended responses with precision. I will say that the Dave Metz – FM3 Research: There was sort of an overwhelming tone of frustration that emerged in those open ended responses Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Lots of people who based on their self description of their circumstances were sometimes in fairly desperate places where they really wanted to get additional help. But in most cases they just said the financial barriers made it impossible that they Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Their insurance wouldn’t cover it or they looked into it and were given a price for what the service would cost and it was just beyond their range of what they could afford Dave Metz – FM3 Research: That was the primary barrier that people talked about, but there were also a lot of people who talked about stigma and said, I was just afraid. I didn’t want my family to find out. I didn’t want my friends to find out

Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And seeking help would have entailed that people might have known, and I was worried about being judged as a result Dave Metz – FM3 Research: That’s a smaller subgroup. But obviously, it’s troubling. If there are significant numbers of Coloradans who want help, and are afraid to get it for those reasons, and then there were logistical concerns which again we can’t parse it too closely Dave Metz – FM3 Research: You know by subgroups within that number, but it seems likely that rural Coloradans were disproportionately impacted by some of those logistical concerns Dave Metz – FM3 Research: We had a number of respondents who talked about that they would have had to drive very, very long distances to access the care that they needed Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And that, that in and of itself was a significant barrier Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Great, thank you for that Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: We have a question about whether or not we asked respondents if they had health insurance, and if so, what were the numbers on that. And is there any more geographically specific data say by county or by region that were able to report out about health insurance status Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And the answer is yes, we have data on both whether or not the Respondents have health insurance. And then the type of health insurance they have, whether they’re covered by a public plan or a private plan Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And so that’s all available within the the data tools that will be talking about shortly that that people can take a look at Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And I don’t have the numbers in front of me Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But I grabbed it Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: That’s why there’s two of us really Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: An honesty Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: It was about one in 10 so they don’t have Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Health insurance predictively. Most had it through their employer or their or their spouses employer Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Or, you know, have Medicare so Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: You know, we have very little Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Very little in terms of try care in terms of military or VA here but Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: There was about one in 10 those said they indicated they did not have health insurance. At this time, although in, you know, Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: One thing that may be impacting worry about having health insurance in the future, as we’ve seen in past work that sometimes individuals will tell us that Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: They have health insurance now but they may not have had it in the past. So there, there’s a significant proportion of Coloradans who have experienced being without health insurance at some point Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Yeah. And while we’re talking about this. I’ll put in a reminder and group together a handful of questions we’ve been getting about what types of ways of looking at the data are available and a few of the things that we’re making Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Available because we’re making everything from what we heard on this poll, transparent and fully available on the website. We’ve created two houses information Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Is you’ll be able to see every question that we asked and what’s called the top line results for every question that we asked, and that’s Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: You know the weighted sample that’s representative of all adults in Colorado, and what that top line figure looks like every single question that we asked so you can see everything that we asked and the top line results for it Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And then we’re also posting something that’s called the cross tabs and that’s where you can look question by question and compare how people answered on any one question Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: To how the groups of people from that question responded differently or not to the other questions on the pole Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So you can take things like whether or not somebody said they had health insurance coverage and see whether or not that made a difference for how they answered. Other questions on the pole as well Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And so as I said at the beginning, during the presentation the slides, we put together today. You saw a sampling Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Of what we’re able to do with a sample size as large as over 2000 Coloradans on this poll, but not everything Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: There’s much more data that’s available to look at in deeper detail and will show you a website and just a minute, where you can Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Take your own Odyssey through that data. So we’ve seen lots of questions in the chat about whether or not you can look more specifically at subsets of Coloradans about that and the answer is yes Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And we close the field and curative ethical not all that long ago. So we’re ourselves just beginning to scratch the surface on the depths of what’s in there Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And so that’s why we wanted to make this available to you all as well. And just like I said start this conversation with folks across Colorado Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Because we’re really interested in where your eyes are going what you’re curious about it, looking at it in the data as well. And that’s why we’re making it available to you Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: I’ll take another question we got in from the chat box Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: How does the response to do you think black Coloradans are more or less likely than light color no experience, no negative outcomes compare across political party identification Dave Metz – FM3 Research: That is a good question. Kyle, if you give me a minute, I can look that up. Maybe, maybe we can take another question. First of all, I’m looking at those numbers and then come back to it

Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Sure. So maybe this one’s a little bit easier to answer off the top of your head Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: A few folks said that they were surprised about some of the responses on our questions about childcare and whether or not Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Folks who are parents were having difficulty with childcare. So they were they were wondering, When did we ask these questions, was it during summertime. Was it when kids were supposed to be back in school. So could you put those numbers in that context for us Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Yeah, so we were interviewing during August, so Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: You know, the vast majority of the interviews were completed when it should have been summer I know dates got pushed back are changed around a little bit Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So, the vast majority were prior to any sort of remote learning or back to school in person learning. So that could be having an impact on on how Coloradans are responding to the either the knees or difficulty of caring for children during the pandemic and Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: So that may be playing some role will see how they feel in a couple months after more school is taking place, but there were some that were declared differences and in terms of Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: In terms of income. And I don’t remember in terms of age of child that I can try and find out, well well as answer any other questions Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But we do have parents, we do have age range and the trial as a cross tab to sign songs asking about them. So we can look at some questions in relation to that Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Yeah, Laurie while you’re on that topic we’ve gotten a handful of questions that would sort of grouped together Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: In the vein of folks wanting to Blair different cross tabs on top of each other. So can we look at, say, not just parents, but specifically parents who are living on low incomes, or in low income households and all that. Is that something that’s possible with the data that we have Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Yeah, we can certainly run some more distinctions. I mean, we had so much here Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But yeah, with it, with the larger sample size. It’s really one of the benefits that we Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Can look at parents by different income ranges and some other things. So we’d have to run a few more cross tabs, even more than we have Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: But we can we can come up with some distinctions like that Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And Kyle I have the numbers now Dave Metz – FM3 Research: For the partisan differences in perceptions of Dave Metz – FM3 Research: The degree to which black Coloradans are likely to experience things differently than white Coloradans are. And there are some pretty big partisan gaps among Democrats 87% of Coloradans think that black Coloradans are more likely to be treated unfairly by police 81% Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Think they’re more likely to Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Be economically impacted in a downturn and 77% of democrats think by Coloradans are more likely to experience poor quality healthcare offer independence, the figures on those three issues are 57% 50% Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And 51% so overwhelming majorities of democrats slight majority of independence proceed racial inequities that are impacting black Coloradans Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Republicans are much less likely to have that Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Perception Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Only 30% perceived the black Coloradans are Dave Metz – FM3 Research: More likely to be treated unfairly by police 26% that they’re more likely to lose a job in a downturn and 21% that they’re more likely to receive for quality healthcare Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Thanks, Dave. We have another question about some of the data on racial equity that we got Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: In it is regarding the data on Asian American Pacific Islanders does the survey account for the difference in experience of the refugees from Southeast Asia that live in Colorado Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: I’m struck about people’s perceptions Asian Americans have not experienced so much hardship as other groups and Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: I think embedded in that is, you know, we know that when we pull out cross tabs of the data Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: That that can give us data or information about a group as a whole, but it can’t really tell us much about differences within that group or you know whether or not folks within a category of people Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: You know, are experiencing things differently or thinking about things differently. Is that correct, Dave Metz – FM3 Research: That’s absolutely correct. And, and we also need to keep in mind that Dave Metz – FM3 Research: All of these racial and ethnic subcategories, we’re looking at are very Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Sort of blunt and inaccurate ways to characterize the very diverse experiences that Coloradans with lots of different backgrounds have Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Within each category of black Coloradans Hispanic and Latinx Colorado and I think especially Asian Pacific Islander Coloradans those group together. People who come from a variety of

Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Different Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Countries have national origin and their family history and I’ve had very, very different experiences and have very different perspectives and you know as as robust as our sample is we need an even much larger one to be able to tease out those very meaningful differences within Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Each of those subcategories. So we need to acknowledge that the data is really inadequate to Dave Metz – FM3 Research: explore some of those important but Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Sort of smaller population subgroups that we need to look at. And unfortunately, Dave Metz – FM3 Research: You know, looking at distinctions Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Between the experience of Southeast Asian refugees as the questioner asks versus other Asian American Pacific Islander Coloradans is we just don’t have the ability to do that with the data, but it’s a very important Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Thank you. We got another question about a different demographic subgroup in the poll so early on in the presentation Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: A few folks were asking whether or not we had questions or had asked about sexual orientation and gender identity and we’re able to break out the data by those demographics as well Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And then a little bit later on into the presentation folks did see one piece of that data. So yes, we did ask about full sexual orientation and gender identity Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And where it showed up in the presentation was in some of the data around fear of police and experiences with police misconduct among LGBT Q Coloradans Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And the question here is, LGBT Q Coloradans are more afraid of police than black or African American comments to see the LGBT LGBT Q populations are the most afraid of police at 49% the seem to be the highest of your category. Do you see any reason for this Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: As a trend within the state Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Well, unfortunately, I don’t think we have data to go into why that might be. And all the experienced the broad breadth of experiences that might have been Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Seen there. So it’s hard to say. I mean, that’s this is obviously one data point that we’re kind of want to monitor and look for look for in in future surveys Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Because part of the goal of this obviously is to create a baseline that we’re going to be able to monitor in the future Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Going forward, to understand if that’s something that’s increasing or something that may have spiked for some reason and and is reduced in in future surveys. So it’s really hard to say. Unfortunately, Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Yeah, that’s a good point and polling and quantitative research like this is a really great way to understand what people are experiencing or what they’re thinking Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: But it’s limited in its ability to tell us why some of those things might be the case or why people might respond in the way that they do to these polls, but it does have that power for us to you Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: See, and to identify patterns in the data of what people are experiencing and what they’re thinking Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And then that leads us to even more questions. Like I said, so going great, and answering some of the things that were curious about and putting that in some contexts Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: But it often leads to more questions. So as I’m seeing that as a theme from any of the comments that are getting in the chat Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: I have a question about how we asked about income or sort of groups people by income on the survey were incomes based on the individual surveyed or was there waiting for family size of the individual with the sole Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: source of income Dave Metz – FM3 Research: The question was about household income total income for Paul residents of your, your household in 2019 Dave Metz – FM3 Research: We also have data on household size. So we can see how those two factors interact Dave Metz – FM3 Research: And then we have a couple of other like Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: follow up questions on that, on that same vein, was party affiliation evenly scaled across all incomes for both parties Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Was in was party affiliation of those surveyed also evenly distributed across all racial and ethnic categories GD know what the racial makeup of the various income groups Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Yeah Dave Metz – FM3 Research: So, Dave Metz – FM3 Research: party affiliation was Dave Metz – FM3 Research: distributed randomly and representatively across the population, but not uniformly Dave Metz – FM3 Research: It is the case. The Coloradans of different racial and ethnic backgrounds, different greatly in which political party they affiliate with Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Same is true across income levels. Same is true across more urban and rural responses. So we have the ability to understand how you know an urban democrat versus a rural Democrat Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Might view things differently. But there are different numbers of democrats in urban and rural areas and the survey reflected the distribution in the the population along those scores Dave Metz – FM3 Research: I don’t have the numbers right in front of me, but there is a correlation between race and income Coloradans of color were more likely to be

Dave Metz – FM3 Research: well represented in the lower income subgroups them were white Coloradans and again that just reflects the Dave Metz – FM3 Research: You know, the, the way that incomes are distributed across the state Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Yeah, it was, it was not quite twice as likely that a Black Cauldron would be in the lowest income Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Category as a white collar on that is fairly close to that. I think it was 16% of black Coloradans we’re in the lowest income versus 9% of white household, so. So there’s definitely a relationship there Lori Weigel, New Bridge Strategy: Thanks for Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Another question about our data on mental health and substance use issues did you ask how many Coloradans had sought help for mental health or substance use issues if so I’m curious what population and those who saw need did not get those services Dave Metz – FM3 Research: That’s a fascinating question and it’s one, I think we should consider for future years. We simply ask the question, have you said Karen and been unable to attain it Dave Metz – FM3 Research: So we don’t know what profit percentage of the population sought care and was able to attain it. And as you say that would be a very interesting complimentary data point, because it would give us a sense of just how many of those seeking care have been unsuccessful in getting it Dave Metz – FM3 Research: You know, as I think a number of these questions are pointing out, there’s lots of fascinating additional questions, we could ask to explore some of these findings and more detail Dave Metz – FM3 Research: Unfortunately, just have limited room in the questionnaire in terms of what we can ask, and as Kyle said Dave Metz – FM3 Research: The results of this year’s poll. I think have prompted a lot of good follow up questions of which this is one which we definitely should consider for for future years versions of the survey Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Thank you. And we’re getting a number of questions just about where do we go from here what comes next, and all that. So I’ll see for a moment about that category of things we heard reality about Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: At the beginning of this presentation. You’ve heard us introduce pulse as an annual poll from the car and Health Foundation Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And this is the first year of what we do intend to do every year in the state of Colorado to ask questions like this Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Abroad and representative set of Coloradans to get that pulse on what people mistake or both experiencing, and then what they’re thinking Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: We do intend to do this again in the future and our intent is Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: To repeat at least some of the questions we ask this year, every year, so we’re able to track whether or not some of these things are changing over time, you know, does 2021 look different in any way from how folks responded in 2020 Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So you can expect to see another set of data like this from the car and Health Foundation in our partners again in 2021 and years beyond that Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So do look forward to that. In the meantime, as I said, we barely scratched the surface at this point in time Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And the right set of information and data that we heard from Colorado and this year’s bowl. And so there’s a lot more that we’re going to be doing Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Both with the data from this poll, but then also to build on and to not to stop and what we heard. And what we found in this set of data and a couple of things. I’ll say on that front Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So we had a few people asked if the Health Foundation is going to be hosting or participating in future conversations like this and not just the presentation, but more of a dialogue about this kind of data Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And the short answer is yes, we would love to have those conversations with folks like you in communities across the state Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: To really hear from you, what’s interesting in this data to you, what strikes you what further questions is this prompt in your head Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And like I said, we want this to be a point in the conversation, but certainly not the end point in a conversation about what’s impacting our health, our quality of life for different folks in Colorado Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Another thing they’ll know is that as Karen said at the heart of Health Foundation. We’re deeply committed to listening as something that’s mission critical for us and doing our work Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: To advance in and to improve the health of people in Colorado and listening is both an art and a science today. You got an earful about a scientific way of listening Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: But this is not the only scientific way that we can apply some of the methodological rigors of the discipline of public opinion research to really listening to and to understanding the perceptions of folks in Colorado Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Quantitative data like this that you can get from a poll from abroad random sample of folks across the state of Colorado has a lot of value and we can learn a lot from this kind of pull to Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: But we’re also interested in listening in different ways as well. And so the Colorado how foundation is going to be Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Investing in other kinds of research there and more qualitative and open ended in nature to where we can dig a little bit deeper than what we’re able to do in a quantitative pole like this

Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: On a pole like this, we’re able to ask a lot of people, a lot of different questions and qualitative research other ways of listening Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: That’s better suited towards asking a smaller number of people are more focused number of people that you’re unlikely to get represented in a poll like this Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: A deeper set of questions where we can have a much longer, and a much deeper conversation with them. So you’ll see information from projects like that coming out from the car to Health Foundation overtime. In addition to feature additions of the pulse pole and the years ahead Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: We’ve been alluding to a fancy website. We’ve created to share with you and to make transparent and accessible to you and anyone that you would like to share this with Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: The data from this year’s pole. When am I find colleagues at the cardinal Health Foundation will put out in the chat box. The link to get to this website to be created for the pulse poll Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So that you can go to and navigate your way through it yourself. But right now and get into a quick demonstration of what that website for the pulse poll looks like Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: There, hopefully now you can see my screen shared with you and this is what that homepage of the website looks like Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So this is our new home for all of the data that we heard from Coloradans on this year’s Colorado political and I want to point you to a few of the things that are available on this website Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So this is the homepage that you see on your screen right now. Probably one of the things that you’ll be most curious about is this Results tab right there Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And this is the page on the website where you can go deep on whatever part of the data you’re curious about Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: If you scroll down to the very bottom of the page here you’ll see sort of the, the PDF versions of the complete questionnaire of the poll and what I call this top line result. So that’s where you can see every question that we asked Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And the top line data for the sample overall of what people said for each of those questions Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Right below that you’ll see what we call the cross tabs. That’s where you can dive into specific subsets of the folks who responded to this poll and see how their answers compared to the rest of the sample in the poll as well Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: You’ll see a key findings document where we lift up in narrative form some of the things we shared with you on this presentation today Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: If you scroll up to the top of that results page you’ll see what I’m really thinking of is one of the most cool things we’ve set up on this website Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And this is an interactive way of doing that slicing and dicing the data of what we heard from Colorado. It’s about specific questions Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: They’re able to pull out categories of questions like, we asked about hunger and food insecurity and together on this interactive Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Place on the web page you’ll see all of the questions that we asked about that topic. And if you look at these green bars on either side of the questions data. What you see in the middle right now is the top line data. So the results. Overall, but on these Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Columns on the side, you’re able to highlight the answers for specific groups of people in Colorado and see how those groups of people answered specifically on each of these questions Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So if you’re curious about hunger and food insecurity and what we heard from Coloradans on that, and specifically what we heard from that next Coloradans Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: You just click on them and the column to the either side of the data. And you’ll see the data change and now it’s just displaying what you Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: What the data tells us from that specific subset of Coloradans about the questions that you want to go deeper on Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: So all of that is available on that results page which you can get to you at the top bar of the website. A couple of other things I’ll point out to you Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: One is this for partners page that we’ve set up here Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: If you are inspired curious excited to share the data that you saw in this poll with other people to drop it into presentations that you’re doing to social media that you might be doing Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: We created some infographics that you can download and use and drop into things you want to share to cross conversations or to share information with folks that you may be talking to or listening with as well. And that’s on the four partners had right up here Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: We do have a press kit section up here. This is where you see things and more narrative form. So a press release Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: The top, the top line, the media release, things like that that are easier if you’re wanting to likes to read narrative. You can find a lot of that stuff there Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And then the final thing that I’ll show you is the sign up button over here at the top. This is where, as I said, we hope to continue this conversation with all of you Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: If you’re interested in giving us feedback about this poll things that you would like to see on future research from the color Health Foundation Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Please add your name on the Sign Up button at the top, one of the things that we will be doing over the course of this year is Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: Taking that deeper dive into the data ourselves and publishing different reports different cross tabs different analyses that go deeper into what we heard on from Coloradans

Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: From this year’s 2020 pulse poll so signing up there is your best way to make sure that you receive all of that stuff. As soon as we have it ready to release to you Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: And then this contact page is where you can give us feedback about this presentation about the data about what you might like to see in future research from the car Health Foundation Paul as well. So feel free to continue the conversation with us there Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: That’s the the website that we’ve set up. Thank you all again for your time today and we very much appreciate it. Thank you to our polling team of Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: lorry red lorry Lego and Dave, Matt, thank you to all my wonderful colleagues with the Colorado Health Foundation to help to make this project possible Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: We hope that this was interesting for you and we hope that, like I said, this is the beginning of lots of conversations and not the end. So we look forward to Kyle Rojas Legleiter – Colorado Health Foundation: hearing more from you about what was interesting and what you’d like to see more from in these results going forward. Thank you very much. We appreciate it and have a wonderful day